Hello,

I thought you might like to hear about our latest project.

Greenpeace and New Scientist have come together to create a series of four Science Debates where, inspired by both reason and passion, we can debate some of the profound ways in which science and technology may affect the way we live and think in the future.

Obviously Greenpeace and New Scientist take different views on a number of things in relation to these debates, but we do agree that the future impact of science and technology needs public debate, public enlightenment and the empowerment of individuals to help make decisions about the future.

Demand from the public for tickets to the debate is very high and we expect them to sell out shortly. To book a ticket call the RI box office on 020 7670 2985 or e-mail: bookings@ri.ac.uk.

If you'd like to know any more please let me know.

Hope you can make it.

Best Wishes

Doug

Dr. Douglas Parr
Chief Scientific Adviser
Greenpeace UK
Tel: (+44) 020 7 865 8240
Fax: (+44) 0207 865 8200
http:\\www.greenpeace.org.uk


WHAT IS ' NATURAL ' ?

TUESDAY 16 APRIL 2002 AT 7.30PM

What does the biotechnology century do to our relationship with nature?
Will we enjoy wandering through a garden less if we know the flowers are built in the lab?
Is our idea of "the natural "simply a romantic myth that needs to be abandoned?

Richard Dawkins, Simonyi Professor of the public understanding of science at the
University of Oxford, and author of the Selfish Gene.

Patrick Holden, head of the Soil Association and a leading campaigner for organic farming.

Aubrey Manning , professor emeritus of biology at Edinburgh University and presenter of BBC TV 's Earth Story.

Chris Leaver , head of plant sciences at the University of Oxford.

THE SEARCH FOR PERFECTION

TUESDAY 30 APRIL 2002 AT 7.30PM

Medical science lets us change our appearance or personality, and control our
reproductive fate. But along the way, we have become obsessed with perfection and eliminating defects. Do we really know whether it is better to be a permanently contented Barbie doll or a wildly creative manic depressive with a crooked nose?

John Harris , professor of bioethics at Manchester University, and author of Clones,Genes and Immortality.

Tom Shakespeare , director of outreach at the Policy, Ethics and Life. Sciences Research Institute in Newcastle, and author of Genetic Politics:From Eugenics to
Genome
.

Kathy Phillips , health and beauty director at Vogue.


TECHNOLOGY:TAKING THE GOOD WITHOUT THE BAD?

TUESDAY 14 MAY 2002 AT 7.30PM

As the frontiers of biotech, nanotech and IT get weirder and wilder, are major risks emerging? Should we ban some technologies because they are too easy to subvert? Could we become slaves to the system without even noticing?

Robin Grove-White , professor of science and society, Institute for Environment, Philosophy and Public Policy at Lancaster University.

Ian Pearson , futurologist at BTexact.

Jon Turney , head of science and technology studies at University College London.


CAN SCIENCE BE DIRECTED?

TUESDAY 16 APRIL 2002 AT 7.30PM

Why do we spend billions on GM and only millions on understanding Earth' s ecology? Are scientists powerful without being accountable? Is most funding really fuelling corporate agendas outside our control? Do we need to make the forces that drive science explicit so we can make choices that benefit more people?

Vandana Shiva , physicist, leading environmental activist, and author of Biopiracy: the Plunder of Nature and Knowledge.

Martin Rees , Astronomer Royal Steve Fuller , professor of sociology at the University of Warwick, and author of The Governance of Science.

Details correct at time of going to press

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